“HIV Cure” Scientists Remove Virus’s DNA from Living Tissue

cure

Researchers and scientists have managed to remove DNA of the HIV virus from living tissue for the first time in a breakthrough that could lead to the cure.

At the moment, drugs are used to suppress levels of the virus so the body’s immune system can cope. Now scientists have used gene-editing technology to remove DNA of the commonest HIV-1 strain from several organs of infected mice and rats.

The same team reported that they had successfully eliminated the virus from human cells in the laboratory, they had managed to do the same thing in live animals for the first time.

Professor Kamel Khalili, of Temple University, said: “In a proof-of-concept study, we show[ed] that our gene-editing technology can be effectively delivered to many organs of two small animal models and excise large fragments of viral DNA from the host cell genome.”

The current antiretroviral drugs for HIV are not able to eliminate HIV-1 from the infected cells. And if treatment is interrupted, the virus can start replicating quickly, putting patients of risk of getting full-blow AIDS.

This is because it is able to persist in immune system T-cells and other places where it is not actually active and is unaffected by the current treatments. The researchers used a specially adapted virus to deliver the gene-editing system into the cells.

“The ability of the rAAV delivery system to enter many organs containing the HIV-1 genome and edit the viral DNA is an important indication that this strategy can also overcome viral reactivation from latently infected cells and potentially serve as a curative approach for patients with HIV,” Professor Khalili said.

Professor Khalili said a clinical trial could happen within the next few years.

Conversations

Urban Entertainment